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Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide

First Published: 2016-05-11

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CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1 Overview 1

CHAPTER 2 Choosing the Right Access Point 3
Models 3
Part Numbers and Descriptions 4
Supported Code Versions Compatible with AP 2800 and AP 3800 5
Differences between the AP 2800 and AP 3800 Access Points 5
Feature Differences 8
Ports on the AP 2800 and AP 3800 9
Modularity and Smart Antenna Connector Ports 10

CHAPTER 3 Physical Hardware and Mounting Options 13
Access Point Physical Hardware and Mounting Options 13
Channel Rail Adapters 14
Mounting an AP Directly into the Tile Using Optional AIR-AP-BRACKET-3 16
Using an In-tile Mount from Oberon Wireless 18
Wall-mounting the AP 18
Changing the Color of an AP 21
Clean Rooms (Healthcare) 22
Above the Ceiling Tiles 22

CHAPTER 4 Understanding Flexible Radio Assignment (software overview) 25
Understanding Flexible Radio Assignment (Software Overview) 25
Flexible Radio Architecture (FRA) System 26

CHAPTER 5 Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell 27
Understanding Macro and Micro Cells 27
Client Roaming from a Macro to Micro Cell 29

Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide
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Contents Client Roaming from a Micro to Macro Cell 29 Micro and Macro cells on “I” Series Access Points 30 RF Operations on “E/P” Series Access Points 33 CHAPTER 6 Approved Antennas for Use with Access Points 2800 and 3800 39 CHAPTER 7 AP 2800 and AP 3800 Powering Options 41 CHAPTER 8 AP 3800 and Multigigabit Ethernet (mGig) 47 CHAPTER 9 New–B Regulatory Domain for US Theater 51 CHAPTER 10 Stadium and Harsh Environments 53 CHAPTER 11 Areas with High Vibration 55 CHAPTER 12 Related References 57 Previous Deployment Guides 57 CHAPTER 13 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) 59 Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide iv .

part numbers and descriptions • Supported code versions • Differences between AP 2800 and AP 3800 • Physicals / Hardware details. CHAPTER 1 Overview This document covers the Cisco 2800/3800 Series Access Points theory of operation and installation as part of a Cisco wireless LAN (WLAN) solution. E and P versions • Approved antennas and new FCC regulatory –B domain • AP 2800 and AP 3800 powering options and requirements • AP 3800 and Multigigabit Ethernet (mGig) Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 1 . mounting options. bracket choices • Third party mounting options including hospital and cleanroom environments • Understanding Flexible Radio Assignment (FRA) and architecture • Understanding Macro and Microcells • Looking at roaming between cells • Hardware differences in FRA between I. Subjects related include: • Choosing the right access point.

Overview Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 2 .

CHAPTER 2 Choosing the Right Access Point • Models. page 5 • Differences between the AP 2800 and AP 3800 Access Points. together referenced as 4x4:3. an innovative antenna technology comprising four transmit radios and four receive radios called 4x4 in a Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) configuration and supporting three spatial streams (3SS).0. page 5 • Feature Differences. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 3 . Using this type of antenna system along with additional Modulation Coding Scheme (MCS) rates supporting up to 256 QAM and up to 160 MHz channel bonding. page 3 • Part Numbers and Descriptions . page 8 • Ports on the AP 2800 and AP 3800 . page 10 Models The Cisco 2800 and 3800 Series Access Points target customers requiring support for mission-critical and best in class applications. page 9 • Modularity and Smart Antenna Connector Ports . The 2800/3800 embodies ClientLink 4. page 4 • Supported Code Versions Compatible with AP 2800 and AP 3800 . rates of up to 5 Gbps can be supported.

External Antenna Model AIR-AP3802I-x-K9C Single Unit. The “e” version also supports mounting inside NEMA enclosures for use in the most demanding environments. Part Numbers and Descriptions SKU Description AIR-AP3802I-x-K9 Single Unit. Internal Antenna Model. Figure 1: Access Point Portfolio Placement Access points are available in three models: • Internal antennas version labeled “i” that has captured antennas (part of the housing and not removable). Choosing the Right Access Point Part Numbers and Descriptions ClientLink 4. • Access points for professional install are labeled “p” series and may be used in outdoor applications.11a/g/n/ac and now ac Wave-2 clients including those supporting 3 spatial streams. Internal Antenna Model. factories. • External antennas version labeled “e” that is more rugged and designed for industrial use in locations such as hospitals.0 uses these features along with an additional antenna (N+1) to allow for beam-forming for all 802. Internal Antenna Model AIR-AP3802I-xK910 10 pack. Configurable AIR-AP3802I-xK910C 10 pack. Configurable Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 4 . External Antenna Model AIR-AP3802E-xK910 10 pack. anywhere a need exists for external antennas and/or extended operating temperatures. Internal Antenna Model AIR-AP3802E-x-K9 Single Unit. and warehouses. The “i” series is designed for indoor Enterprise installations where office aesthetics are a primary concern.

External Antenna Model. Choosing the Right Access Point Supported Code Versions Compatible with AP 2800 and AP 3800 SKU Description AIR-AP3802E-x-K9C Single Unit. External Antenna Model. Configurable Supported Code Versions Compatible with AP 2800 and AP 3800 The minimum versions supporting the AP 2800 and 3800 are: • Wireless LAN Controller (WLC) AirOS release 8.2.3 • Prime release 3.2 • ISE 2. Figure 2: AP 2800 and AP 3800 (I and E) versions Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 5 .0 Differences between the AP 2800 and AP 3800 Access Points The mechanical front of the AP 2800 and AP 3800 are nearly identical in physical appearance.2MR1 • Polaris release 16.1MR1 • MSE or CMX 10. Configurable AIR-AP3802E-xK910C 10 pack.

The AP 3800 is a bit more robust as it has support for mGig (NBASE-T) and optional module support. Figure 4: AP 2800/3800 Dimensions Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 6 . "P" version up to 13 dBi. Choosing the Right Access Point Differences between the AP 2800 and AP 3800 Access Points The AP 3800 is also available in a "P" version. AP 2800 on left is smooth and does not have heat fins. Figure 3: AP 2800/3800 There are slight differences in the weight and thickness of the 2800 and 3800. The external antenna "E" versions permit antenna gains up to 6 dBi.

1 kg. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 7 .AP 3800i is 2. Both products use the same brackets as 2700/3700 2700/3700 Series Access Points–AIR-AP-BRACKET1 and AIR-AP-BRACKET-2.Choosing the Right Access Point Differences between the AP 2800 and AP 3800 Access Points Depending on the model the thickness changes slightly. AP 2800i is 1.0 kg.6 kg. Figure 5: AP 2800 and AP 3800 dimensions Note The weight is slightly different between the models.AP 3800 both “E” and “P” versions as well as the 2800e is 2.

Choosing the Right Access Point Feature Differences Feature Differences Here is a basic feature comparison: Figure 6: Feature comparisons of 2800 and 3800 series Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 8 .

This is a new style connector and is not compatible with the older AIR-PWR-B power supplies used with the AP 2700 and AP 3700 series. Additionally. Figure 7: Ports on 2800 series Figure 8: Ports on 3800 series The AP 3800 has a local power supply jack on the right. Choosing the Right Access Point Ports on the AP 2800 and AP 3800 Ports on the AP 2800 and AP 3800 The AP 2800 is similar to the AP 3800 but lacks a local power supply input and mGig PoE port. see the AP 2800 and AP 3800 Powering Options for details. the USB port is mounted sideways. For more on this connector. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 9 .

This module design allows for installation onto the side of the access point. as the additional 5–GHz radio cannot use the same top antennas on the access point that are being used by the primary 5–GHz radio. Figure 9: External module port on the 3800 series Modularity and Smart Antenna Connector Ports The AP 3800 has modularity support that is a bit different from the original module design on the prior AP 3600 and AP 3700 series. Choosing the Right Access Point Modularity and Smart Antenna Connector Ports In addition there is an mGig port as well as a port for external modules on the AP 3800. The external antenna connectors on the "E" and "P" series are identical to the antenna connectors on previous access points. a smart antenna connector must be used on the external antenna models. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 10 . There is no difference in operation when the access point is used in dual band (2. filtering is installed on the AP 3800 for cellular and other radio coexistence. This allows for larger antenna arrays and does not constrict the development of Cisco and potentially third party modules as they are no longer limited by the physical size of the cccess point. which is the default mode. the new 2800 and 3800 series Access Points now support the capability of dual 5–GHz operation. Unlike the prior external antenna versions. When in this mode. Additionally. RF coverage and cell sizes are similar to the previous AP 2700 and 3700 series so there is no need to do a new site survey.4 and 5 GHz) operation.

Figure 10: External connector ports on AP 2800e and 3800e Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 11 .Choosing the Right Access Point Modularity and Smart Antenna Connector Ports When a smart antenna connector is installed. the XOR radio (the radio that is defined in software as Radio 0) now has its RF switched to the smart antenna connector.

Choosing the Right Access Point Modularity and Smart Antenna Connector Ports Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 12 .

the selection default is AIR-AP-BRACKET-1. page 13 Access Point Physical Hardware and Mounting Options AP 2800 and AP 3800 have similar physical dimensions with only slight differences in physical appearance mostly to accommodate the different features like modularity and Multigigabit support resulting in slight differences in width. additional memory and processor power as well as additional Ethernet capability including mGig on the AP 3800 and optional module support. Brackets are available from Cisco as well as third-party companies. the customer may choose one of two brackets (but not both). CHAPTER 3 Physical Hardware and Mounting Options • Access Point Physical Hardware and Mounting Options. which is the most popular for ceiling installations. Note The AP 2800 and AP 3800 is noticeably heavier than the AP 2700 and AP 3700. This is due to the powerful design of the components used. which include a dual core processor. 12 radio transceivers. If the customer does not choose a bracket. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 13 . During the ordering process. The other choice is a universal bracket that carries part number AIR-AP-BRACKET-2. Each bracket is a zero-dollar ($0) option at the time of configuration. There are many different installation options available depending upon the business requirements.

are available. It comes in a two-pack and attaches to the ceiling grid clip above. The extra space in the bracket allows for wiring. For this reason. recessed and flush rails. two different styles of ceiling clips. or inside a NEMA enclosure or perhaps wall mounted. and the extra holes line up with many popular electrical boxes. if the AP will be mounted to an electrical box or other wiring fixture. then AIR-AP-BRACKET-1 mounts flush and has the lowest profile. For new installations AIR-BRACKET-2 is recommended as it provides a little extra room and accomodates earlier access points with modules. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 14 . Figure 12: Different clips are available for attaching to ceiling grid work Channel Rail Adapters When mounting APs to ceiling channel rails such as the ones shown in Figure 14. then AIR-AP-BRACKET-2 is a much better choice. When mounting the bracket to the ceiling gridwork. However. some ceiling tiles are recessed. Figure 11: Access Point Bracket Choices If the AP will be mounted directly to a ceiling on the gridwork. Physical Hardware and Mounting Options Channel Rail Adapters The mounting brackets and ceiling rails easily handle the extra weight and the intent was to make a very robust Access Point without the need for vent holes and to allow the product to be used in industrial and manufacturing areas as well as commercial enterprise environments. so it truly is a universal bracket. an optional channel adapter is used: AIR-CHNL-ADAPTER.

Figure 13: Example of a recessed ceiling rail system Figure 14: Example of Channel Rails used on thin rail (recessed rail) ceilings Figure 15: AIR-CHNL-ADAPTER (left) Slides onto the Rails Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 15 .Physical Hardware and Mounting Options Channel Rail Adapters Thin rail or sometimes referred to as recessed ceiling rails often look like as shown.

If you have this bracket currently installed and are migrating to the newer AP 2800 and AP 3800 series. part numbers are replacement numbers so they end with an "=". Physical Hardware and Mounting Options Mounting an AP Directly into the Tile Using Optional AIR-AP-BRACKET-3 Figure 16: AIR-CHNL-ADAPTER Mounted to Rail Clip (left) and Finished Installation (right) Note When ordered. you may be able to still use the existing tile and leverage the new in-tile mount available from Oberon Wireless (a Cisco partner). Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 16 . AIR-AP-T-RAIL-R=Ceiling Grid Clip–Recessed AIR-AP-T-RAIL-F=Ceiling Grid Clip–Flush AIR-AP-BRACKET-1=AP Bracket–Low Profile AIR-AP-BRACKET-2=AP Bracket –Universal AIR-CHNL-ADAPTER=Additional Adapter for Channel–Rail Ceiling Grid profile Mounting an AP Directly into the Tile Using Optional AIR-AP-BRACKET-3 Note This bracket is not compatible with the AP 2800 and AP 3800 Series.

Physical Hardware and Mounting Options Mounting an AP Directly into the Tile Using Optional AIR-AP-BRACKET-3 For completeness. When using this bracket. physical security of the AP can be maintained by the use of a Kensington style lock. A mechanical set screw pulls the AP tight to the ceiling and locks it into the bracket. 3600 and 3700 Series Access Points. the "beauty ring" is used as the template to cut the tile which can be cut using a carpet knife or electric tool such as a rotary cutting tool. but once installed it is difficult to remove the AP without removing the tile as the AP will not slide out from the front side of the tile. Figure 17: Optional AIR-AP-BRACKET-3 to install the AP directly into the tile Note This bracket fits the AP-1040. however. 1140. Many hospitals and other carpeted Enterprise environments prefer a more streamlined look and wish to install the AP directly into the tile.g. Additionally. 1600. here is an overview of the existing AIR-BRACKET-3 so you may understand it better should you encounter it within your deployments. 1260. This can be done on prior Cisco AP products using the optional Cisco AIR-AP-BRACKET-3. 3500. it is not compatible with the 2800 and 3800 series. This supports the AP should the tile become wet or otherwise fail. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 17 . 2600. Cisco does not offer custom cut tiles as there are simply too many different styles and the tiles are easy to cut. The AP is fully supported above the tile with a metal rail that extends the length of the tile. Dremel or Rotozip.. e.

therefore. maintaining 360–degree coverage may be compromised by the wall. the installer should understand that walls can be a physical obstacle to the wireless signal. Physical Hardware and Mounting Options Using an In-tile Mount from Oberon Wireless Using an In-tile Mount from Oberon Wireless Figure 18: Oberon in tile and above tile mounting solutions Additionally. If the wall is an outside wall and/or the goal is to send the signal in a 180-degree pattern instead. a directional antenna often Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 18 . which is often used in hospital infection control areas or places where higher physical security is required. Wall-mounting the AP When wall mounting is desired. Oberon offers a metal locking cabinet that allows the Access Point to be mounted flush to the ceiling.

Instead. use the AP 2800e or AP 3800e (with dipoles pointing vertical). Figure 19: Correct orientation of dipole antennas when mounted on a vertical surface Figure 20: Avoid wall mounting units with internal antennas Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 19 .Physical Hardware and Mounting Options Wall-mounting the AP referred to as a "patch" antenna may be a better choice assuming the AP 2800e or AP 3800e is used.

Physical Hardware and Mounting Options
Wall-mounting the AP

Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide
20

Physical Hardware and Mounting Options
Changing the Color of an AP

Note Wall mounting units with internal antennas in the orientation shown in Figure 20: Avoid wall mounting
units with internal antennas should be avoided. AP 2800i & AP 3800i should use the Oberon mounting
bracket unless roaming is not an issue, example: hotspot, kiosk, or very small venue areas where large
uniform coverage is not needed.

Figure 21: Third Party options to Wall Mount

Changing the Color of an AP
If there is a desire to change the color of an AP, rather than painting the AP which would void the warranty,
consider using colored vinyl tape or using a colored plastic cover from Oberon.

Figure 22: Third-party option for changing AP color, adding custom Logo, or hiding the LED

Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide
21

Physical Hardware and Mounting Options
Clean Rooms (Healthcare)

Clean Rooms (Healthcare)
Many hospitals and factories have requirements to wipe down or gently spray the environment with a chemical
(often diluted liquid that has cleaning / disinfectant properties). The Cisco AP 2800 and AP 3800 are designed
with a purpose–build Wi-Fi chipset using Enterprise and industrial class components. This enables the AP
enclosure to have a Plenum rating and is vent-less, so the unit is ideal for these types of applications.

Note The plastic material used on the AP 2800 and AP 3800 series is Lexan 945. This material was tested for
clean room use with a Steris chemical, trademark name SPOR-KLENZ. See http://
www.sterislifesciences.com/Products/Surface-Disinfectants-Cleaners-and-Alcohols/Sporicides-Sterilant/
Spor-Klenz-Ready-To-Use-Cold-Sterilant.aspx

Figure 23: Third Party Locking Ceiling Mount

Above the Ceiling Tiles
The AP 2800 and 3800 are rated for installation in the Plenum area (UL-2043). Many customers prefer to
locate the AP so that nothing can be visible on the ceiling. In some cases this is preferred for aesthetic reasons,
so customers may install the AP above a drop ceiling. This also may be preferred in high theft areas such as
classrooms or in areas where policy dictates that nothing can be visible on the ceiling.

Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide
22

Figure 25: Oberon Model 1045.com/ http://www.cooperindustries. The Erico Caddy 512a or the Cooper B-Line BA50a or similar T-Bar Grid T-Bar hangars can be used. without lifting ceiling tile Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 23 . and a light pipe that can be pressed through the ceiling tile so you can see the status LED from below. optional T-Bar hangar accessories from third-party companies such Erico and Cooper can be used. Oberon also offers above tile solutions.Above ceiling hanger kit . Figure 24: Example of How to Hang an AP above the Ceiling Tiles For more information see: http://www.this includes a hanger bar and wire.Physical Hardware and Mounting Options Above the Ceiling Tiles When this is a hard requirement.com/ Additionally.erico.

so verify coverage and performance. Physical Hardware and Mounting Options Above the Ceiling Tiles Note Installing APs above the ceiling tiles should only be done when mounting below the ceiling is not an option. The tiles must not be conductive. Figure 26: Installing AP above ceiling tiles: Pick an area clear of obstructions. Always try to mount the AP as close to the inside middle of the tile as possible. such installations can certainly degrade advanced RF features such as voice and location. and avoid areas with obstructions. avoid ceiling clutter Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 24 .

4-GHz and 5–GHz on the flexible radio while the main 5–GHz radio serves clients. Figure 27: Flexible Radio Assignment Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 25 .4-GHz or 5–GHz or serially scan both 2. CHAPTER 4 Understanding Flexible Radio Assignment (software overview) • Understanding Flexible Radio Assignment (Software Overview). page 25 Understanding Flexible Radio Assignment (Software Overview) The AP 2800 and 3800 contain a Flexible Radio Architecture. In a sense the AP is a tri-band radio as it contains a dedicated 5–GHz radio to serve clients and another Flexible Radio (known as an XOR radio) that can be assigned different functions within the network. but this new flexible radio module is able to be configured to serve clients in either 2. The flexible radio is similar to the previous XOR radio used in the Cisco WSSI/WSM modules for the AP 3700.

When using FRA with external antenna ("E/P" models) the antennas may be placed to enable the creation of two completely separate Macro (wide area cells) or two Micro cells (small cells) for HDX or any combination. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 26 .4–GHz or 5–GHz for serving clients (default is 2. FRA enabled APs like the AP2800 and AP 3800 contain an additional integrated 2.4–GHz and 5–GHz on the same silicon • Allows selection of 2.4–GHz) • Allows serial scanning of all 2.4–GHz and 5–GHz channels (in monitor “WSM” mode) • Role selection is manual or Automatic–RRM • Previous WSSI or WSM modules for 3700 were XOR in design • This feature is now integrated into AP 2800 and AP 3800 The benefits of an FRA system are many and address the following issues: • Solves the problem of 2.4/5–GHz XOR "selectable radio" for additional flexibility. two 5–GHz radios may be used in a Micro/Macro cell mode. Understanding Flexible Radio Assignment (software overview) Flexible Radio Architecture (FRA) System Flexible Radio Architecture (FRA) System In addition to the dedicated 5–GHz radio.4–GHz over-coverage • Creating 2 diverse 5–GHz cells doubles the airtime available • Permits one AP with one Ethernet drop to function like two 5–GHz APs • Introduces concept of Macro/Micro cells for airtime efficiency • Allows more bandwidth to be applied to an area within a larger coverage cell • Can be used to address non-linear traffic • Enhances the High Density Experience(HDX) with one AP • XOR radio can be user selected in either band servicing clients or in monitor mode When using FRA with the internal antenna ("I" series models). An FRA system uses a special XOR radio that consists of the following: • 2.

Figure 28: Single 5 GHz and 2. CHAPTER 5 Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell • Understanding Macro and Micro Cells. The lower rate clients that are farther away tend to take more airtime than the closer clients running at faster rates.4 GHz cell (default mode) Channel Utilization at 60% Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 27 . page 27 Understanding Macro and Micro Cells In areas where the AP traditionally has a wide-area coverage clients connected close to the AP are the most spectrum efficient since they are in the near field and negotiate typically at the highest data rates while clients farther away compete at lower data rates. This results in non-linear traffic and increases the overall channel utilization as clients compete for "airtime".

you can either automatically enable an additional 5–GHz cell using Radio Resource Management or you can manually decide that you would like to turn the XOR radio from its default 2.4– GHz to an additional 5–GHz cell. The 2. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 28 .4–GHz coverage while creating two completely RF diverse 5–GHz cells. This not only doubles the air time available to the 5–GHz clients. channel utilization is now reduced to 20% on channel 36 and 24% on channel 108. slower rate packets). this solves the problem of too much 2.4–GHz radio is redundant and in some cases is even turned off. clients farther away are on the air more (sending longer. Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell Understanding Macro and Micro Cells In the figure above. Using FRA. Now instead of 60% channel utilization with the clients in near field competing for airtime from the slower farther away clients. Net result. it also optimizes the client throughput by keeping like clients together for better spectrum efficiency. like clients are now grouped with similar data rate characteristics. later releases will likely allow for different SSIDs. So now the AP is covering a single 5–GHz cell in a Macro or large cell mode. Figure 29: Enabling the FRA XOR radio as a dual 5 GHz AP creating Micro (yellow) and Macro (green cell) By optimizing the FRA to enable the access point to have two 5–GHz radios.4–GHz channels (channel 1) will typically propagate farther than 5–GHz so often the 2. Currently both Macro (green) and Micro (yellow) cells use the same SSID by design.

So in the figure below. Figure 30: Intra-cell roaming Macro cell to Micro cell Client Roaming from a Micro to Macro Cell When a client initially associate to the Micro cell first. Note Note: -55 dBm is the default but configurable using the command line interface (CLI). If a non .11v.11v BSS transition request with the Micro cell BSSID and the only candidate. This is also configurable by user CLI. on association the AP will send an . Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 29 . any client that has RSSI at the AP above the Micro cell threshold of -55 dBm will be moved into the Micro cell. For more on configuring these options see the RRM guide and other resources at http://www.11k neighbor list and a disassociate packet.html In addition to the threshold. If the client supports 802.cisco. In this case.11v client.11v . a client that has RSSI at the AP below the Macro cell threshold of -65 dBm will be moved into the Micro cell -65 dBm by default. the AP will send an 11v BSS Transition request with the Macro cell BSSID as the only candidate. Other methods and optimizations are being investigated. it will send an .on association. if the client supports 802.com/c/en/us/support/ wireless/wireless-lan-controller-software/products-technical-reference-list. Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell Client Roaming from a Macro to Micro Cell Client Roaming from a Macro to Micro Cell The most likely scenario is that a client will associate to the Macro cell first as it will have the bigger footprint and transmitting at a greater RF power. while less likely but certainly possible based on device scan and channels heard.

access points like the AP 2700 and AP 3700 defined the dedicated radios in software as Radio 0 (2. By default the FRA functions as a 2.4–GHz radio *OR* it can be a 5–GHz radio. if an additional radio like the WSM module was installed in the AP 3700 the third radio was defined as Radio 2. Figure 31: Intra-cell roaming Micro to Macro cell Micro and Macro cells on “I” Series Access Points The AP 2800i and AP 3800i have integrated antennas and as such. sometimes called "Slot 2". the system sends an 11K neighbor list and a disassociate packet. Additionally. so out of the box the AP behaves the same as a conventional AP 2700 and AP 3700 operating off the dual band Macro cell (large brass colored) antennas on the four corners in the figure below. Radio 0 is the 2. the non-FRA 5–GHz radio also shares the Macro cell antennas. If you enable the FRA radio from 2.11V client. Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell Micro and Macro cells on “I” Series Access Points For a non . The XOR FRA radio when enabled for 5–GHz must operate using a much lower power and therefore must function as a Micro cell.4–GHz and automatically switches to another set of four Micro cell antennas. when FRA is enabled and dual 5–GHz operation is selected. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 30 . Prior to FRA technology. Now with FRA.4–GHz radio. The Micro cell 5–GHz antennas are designed to co-exist in the near field of the Macro cell antennas with the following caveats. only the non-FRA radio can perform the role of a Macro cell or Micro cell. the FRA radio can no longer use the Macro cell antenna on 2. Note The "E/P" Series with external antennas can operate in any combination of Micro or macro cells.4–GHz) and Radio 1 (5–GHz). This is done because two 5–GHz radios cannot share the same antennas.4–GHz to 5–GHz. hence the term XOR.

3 RF output power on the Micro cell is significantly reduced.Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell Micro and Macro cells on “I” Series Access Points 1 Channels must not be closer than 100–MHz (RRM prevents this). 2 The Micro cell antennas are horizontal polarity and higher gain to create a smaller cell foot print. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 31 .

Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell Micro and Macro cells on “I” Series Access Points 4 SSIDs must be the same (this may change in later releases). Figure 32: Picture of the embedded antenna system and 3D antenna heat maps Figure 33: Smith chart comparing radiation patterns of Macro and Micro cell antennas Figure 34: Smith chart radiation pattern of 2.4 GHz 4 dBi Macro cell antenna Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 32 .

the external antenna model units have four primary RP-TNC connectors on top of the device and an additional four RF connectors as well as digital via a new smart antenna connector. Figure 35: Smart antenna connector is an integrated feature of the "E/P" series products Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 33 . Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell RF Operations on “E/P” Series Access Points RF Operations on “E/P” Series Access Points Unlike the integrated antenna models.

The flexibility to do this allows many different types of modes. Note This is sometimes referred to as Dual Radiating Element (DRE) or dual band mode. from discrete single band operation (SRE) to DRE operation. This allows the top connectors for the 5 GHz radio serving clients and the FRA radio is now free (regardless of mode) to use the smart connector for RF communications. The ability to change the antenna controls (sending different bands 2. However. once the smart antenna connector is inserted.4 GHz/5 GHz DRE mode to the smart connector port. the AP 2800 and AP 3800 "E/P" series function much like an AP 3700 where both the 2. the access point senses the presence of the new connector/antenna and automatically switches the FRA (XOR radio) from the top connector that was previously in 2. Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell RF Operations on “E/P” Series Access Points When the smart antenna connector is not used. Figure 36: Antenna control (default) and with smart antenna connector installed Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 34 .4–GHz FRA radio and the integrated 5–GHz radio share the top RP-TNC connectors in a dual band mode.4 GHz and 5 GHz out of different ports in SRE and/or DRE mode) is sometimes referred to as Cisco "Flexport" and was first introduced in the AP-1530 series.

Figure 37: FRA (XOR) radio defaults to 2.4 GHz Client serving but is selectable in software Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 35 . This can be set manually or automatically if RRM control is desired.Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell RF Operations on “E/P” Series Access Points The role of the XOR radio is selected in software. Client Serving or Monitor mode. and the modes are Band.

Using the smart antenna connector to RP-TNC adapter AIR-CAB002-DART-R the FRA (XOR) radio can now be used in many applications as the RF system on the FRA (XOR) radio will now use the four external RP-TNC connectors for a wide variety of application deployments. Figure 38: Error when channels are set too close If the antenna has a smart antenna connector it allows the AP to sense what type of antenna is installed and configure the AP accordingly.4 GHz to 5 GHz then you must have 100–MHz separation. Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell RF Operations on “E/P” Series Access Points If you change the band from 2. Figure 39: Cisco Smart Antenna Adapter AIR-CAB002-DART-R Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 36 .

the creation of two 5–GHz Macro cells is not possible in addition to separating the 5–GHz cells into different areas (think inside/outside) or different coverage areas in a factory or stadium. the smart connector allows both antenna systems to be located away from each other enabling deployments that cannot be done with the internal model. two different 5–GHz coverage cells can be done with 1 AP Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 37 . many new RF design opportunities become available allowing for many different types of new and unique installations.4–GHz RF operation be on one set of antennas and 5 GHz on a completely different set of antennas. Some deployment options include: 1 Omni and directional deployments (think hospital room and a long hallway) with one AP 2 Any combination of Micro and Macro cell deployments 3 Using stadium antennas. For example. Unlike the internal models. and that is also possible. Figure 40: Smart antenna cable adapter and the Cisco external Omni antenna Since both sets of antennae can be physically spaced apart. Sometimes unique customer requirements dictate that 2.Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell RF Operations on “E/P” Series Access Points The smart RF antenna connector sometimes referred to as a DART carries the digital signals (18 mins) as well as the four analog RF ports from the XOR radio. Note The term DART is an Amphenol trademark name for this type of connector.

Client Roaming in a Micro and Macro Cell RF Operations on “E/P” Series Access Points 4 High ceilings (factory and warehouse deployments) can use back to back 6 dBi Patch antennas 5 AP using 2x 5–GHz radio can double the coverage with the addition of one antenna 6 Conference centers and other locations can double capacity on existing Ethernet cable plan 7 One access point can support both indoor and outdoor deployments 8 Access point can serve 5–GHz clients while performing full 2.4 & 5–GHz wireless monitor radio When using the smart antenna connector and dual 5–GHz mode the caveats are: 1 Channels must not be closer than 100–MHz 2 Antennas should not be mounted so that energy from one antenna is directed into another 3 Ideally if one antenna is Omni then 6 ft or 2 meter physical separation 4 Antennas may be closer if used in Micro cell (very low power) is used 5 Any combination of Micro/Macro can be used as long as physical isolation exists 6 SSIDs must be the same (this may change in later releases) Figure 41: Example using "E/P" version to create two macro cells can be supported Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 38 .

Customers should avoid using UNII-1 band outdoors in the US unless the –P version is used.The new –B products allow for outdoor use provided the correct antenna is used. CHAPTER 6 Approved Antennas for Use with Access Points 2800 and 3800 Figure 42: Approved list of external antenna for use with 2800E/3800E/3800P The above list is the approved antennas for use in the US Theater using the FCC –B domain. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 39 .

Approved Antennas for Use with Access Points 2800 and 3800 Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 40 .

3at or PoE+ Later PoE standards have since emerged with 802. With the introduction of the XOR radio along with more advanced features.3at (30W) PoE equipment or systems that support uPoE for best performance or use a different power source such as a mid-span injector or local power supply.4 GHz radio and processor requiring only 6 Watts of power. processing power and memory.4W powering systems.3af (15. CHAPTER 7 AP 2800 and AP 3800 Powering Options With each advance in wireless technology.4W) powering systems. In 2001 the AP-350 Access Point had one 2. These early PoE access points would fully function using the earlier 802. Note: Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 41 . it simply is not feasible to run these higher performance access points on the older legacy 802.4W) powering systems developed in 2000-2003. access points are increasing in the number of radios.3af (15.3at and PoE+ but would function with "reduced functionality" if powered by the older 802.3af 15.3at providing up to 30 Watts at the Power Sourcing Equipment (PSE). Customers who have such older systems should upgrade to 802. Many of Cisco's previous access points such as the AP-1850 and AP-3700 worked best with the higher power sources 802. Figure 43: Early AP-350 used 6 Watts-Newer AP 3800 requires 802.

3at PoE mechanism that supplies up to 30W (2009)* • UPoE Cisco method of Universal Power over Ethernet that supplies power up to 60W (2014)* Note The * indicates these are approximate dates and PoE is defined as the maximum power required at the source.4W (July 2003)* • IEEE 802.3af PoE mechanism that supplies power up to 15.3bz (NBASE-T) mGig Ethernet support (AP 3800) 9 Future hardware expandability using modular technology (AP 3800) Understanding different types of PoE powering standards: • Cisco Pre-standard PoE .11ac Wave-2 clients 6 Additional (auxiliary) Ethernet port.Original implementation 6-7 Watts (2000-2001)* • Cisco Pre-standard PoE .11a/g/n and . IEEE specification is limited to only TxBF on 802.11ac Wave 1 beamforming)–improving older client connectivity and performance. Performance requires power as the AP 2800 and AP 3800 have much more advanced features such as: 1 Dedicated microprocessor and memory for each radio band 2 Dual core processor to manage access point and Ethernet functionality 3 Additional XOR radio and antenna switching circuitry.3af power source the LED will cycle though the colors and the radios will be disabled. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 42 . AP 2800 and AP 3800 Powering Options If the AP2800 and AP 3800 are powered from an 802. pushing transceiver count to 12 radios 4 Cisco CleanAir silicon for complete spectrum analysis and interference detection 5 Cisco ClientLink powerful (legacy . USB and advanced radio functions such as 160 MHz / Dual XOR 7 Support for smart antenna functionality (WSM monitor mode and enhanced location) 8 802.upgraded to negotiate up to 10-15 Watts via CDP (2001-2003) • IEEE 802.

3at or better power source is not available.3at GbE injector for AP 2800 and AP 3800 (if mGig is not required) Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 43 .3at or better PoE source If an 802.AP 2800 and AP 3800 Powering Options Cisco AP 2800 and AP 3800 easily function with 802. the following Cisco mid-span injectors may be used. Figure 44: AP 2800 and AP 3800 requires an 802.3at powering systems and for advanced features like module support (AP 3800) Cisco UPoE can be used. Figure 45: Low cost 802.

Figure 46: Planned Mid-Span Injector Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 44 .3bz (known as mGig / N-BASE-T). AP 2800 and AP 3800 Powering Options An additional mid-span injector capable of 802.

AIR-PWRINJ4 and AIR-PWRINJ5 • Local power supplies–AIR-PWR-A. Figure 47: White power supply and cord Figure 48: AIR-PWR-50 mechanicals . however the AP 3800 does have a new high wattage supply that can be used in applications where a PoE source is unavailable. AIR-PWR-B and AIR-PWR-C Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 45 .AP 2800 and AP 3800 Powering Options Note The Cisco AP 2800 does not support a local power supply.Spare part # AIR-PWR-50= Note The following Mid-Span devices are not compatible with the AP 2800 AP 3800: • Mid-Span Injectors–AIR-PWRINJ. AIR-PWRINJ3. AIR-PWRINJ2.

AP 2800 and AP 3800 Powering Options Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 46 .

The goal is to deliver up to 5 times the speed in the Enterprise without replacing existing cable structure.11bz are all methods by which faster speeds can be realized (faster than 1G) using existing infrastructure wiring such as CAT-5e. CHAPTER 8 AP 3800 and Multigigabit Ethernet (mGig) Multigigabit Ethernet (mGig). N-BASET and 802. Note Although the AP 2800 does not directly support mGig. Figure 49: Cisco line of mGig capable switches Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 47 . Here are the recommended mGig switches and PoE solutions for the AP 3800 . these are ideal switches for providing the power required by the AP 2800 as well.

which is more than the specified Cat 5e 100MHz bandwidth.5–MHz bandwidth (Cat 5e is 100 MHz) 2 Data rates up to 2.5G requires 100MHz bandwidth (Cat 5e is 100 MHz) 3 Data rates up to 5G requires 200MHz bandwidth. AP 3800 and Multigigabit Ethernet (mGig) Ideally a switch supporting IEEE 802. but within the Cat 6 cable The main point is that 5G operations over Cat 5e may have issues using certain cable configurations due to the fact we are using Cat 5e cable beyond the specification. which is also referred to as N-BASET) will deliver the fastest Ethernet using older cable systems such as CAT-5 and deliver +30W for newer PoE devices.3bz (mGig. Figure 50: Cisco Multigigabit enables speeds over 1G on conventional CAT5e cable systems In regards to cabling structure and Cisco Multigigabit Ethernet: 1 Data rates up to 1G requires 62. Figure 51: Cisco Multigigabit cable support at rates up to 5G Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 48 .

AP 3800 and Multigigabit Ethernet (mGig) *Watch for cross-talk issues in bundles or when cables are in same pipe. Figure 52: Cisco Multigigabit distance limitations Figure 53: Cisco Multigigabit distance limitations Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 49 . cables in a dense area like a pipe or places where five or more cables are tied in a bundle. for example. Keep lengths of CAT-5e between 30-50m or below when using dense cable bundles.

AP 3800 and Multigigabit Ethernet (mGig) Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 50 .

CHAPTER 9 New–B Regulatory Domain for US Theater Recent changes in United States FCC rules requires shifting products from -A domain to -B domain effective June 2. (+3 channels) • New power spectral density and above/below band edge emissions requirements for U-NII3 (5. 128) are re-opened with new test requirements for Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) protection. 2016. 124. (+4 channels) • In the U-NII 1 band (5150-5250 MHz) the allowed TX power level is increased to 1W (for indoor.725-5. point to point) with extreme restrictions on EIRP above 30–degree horizon when used outdoors • The Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) bands (channels 120. Following is a summary of new FCC rules (FCC Order 14-30) require: • U-NII 1 band (5150-5250 MHz) is now allowed for outdoor use. Access Points using -A domain can continue to operate in the US after the June deadline but all new access points being manufactured or sold after June 2 must be -B domain.85 GHz) Figure 54: Spectrum chart depicting new channels in the -B domain Cisco is aggressively implementing this new FCC order: • Cisco WLAN products will comply with new FCC rules Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 51 . outdoor.

they will need to upgrade when they plan to deploy –B AP’s after the June FCC deadline ◦-A and -B domain AP’s can coexist in the same network without issues • RMA’s after June deadline of a –A unit will get a –A in return General thoughts concerning compliance as it relates to the AP 2800 and AP 3800: • For US customers the “–B” domain is now used for AP 3800. This change only applies to the US. all new AP series going forward will support –B at FCS. US customers should not order the –A domain for US based customers. 2016 • Software upgrade is required to support –B domain AP’s ◦US customers who do not plan to deploy –B AP’s are not required to upgrade software. New–B Regulatory Domain for US Theater • Orderability Plans for –B domain SKU’s ◦Recent new AP series already support -B and are orderable. To verify approval that corresponds to a particular country or the regulatory domain used in a specific country. • Customers are responsible for verifying approval for use in their individual countries. This new “-B” domain supports the new channels and transmit powers allowed in the US.cisco. As they are approved. visit http:/ /www. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 52 .com/go/aironet/compliance • Not all regulatory domains have been approved. Other countries that use “–A” are unchanged. however. many AP series already have –B orderable as well ◦Sales of –A and UX SKU’s to US will start to be restricted starting May 1. the part numbers will be available on the Global Price List.

Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 53 . open garden areas or warehouse freezers. may wish to use a NEMA type enclosure. such as stadiums. sporting areas. CHAPTER 10 Stadium and Harsh Environments Customers wishing to install the AP in harsh environments where it may be exposed to weather.

for example.terra-wave.com/ http://www.sparcotech. You may also want to use a pressure vent to prevent moisture accumulation. Also. a black enclosure gets much hotter in the sun then a white one.com/ When using a NEMA type enclosure.oberonwireless. This varies around the world. This seems to vary with regard to weather radar compliance and often UNII-1 compliance. for example. but may prohibit its use outdoors. the color of the enclosure may affect the heat rating.com/ http://www. Figure 55: Example of NEMA Enclosure with pressure vent on bottom Third-party sources for NEMA type enclosures include: http://www. try to have the cables exit out of the bottom of the enclosure so that rain and moisture do not run down the cable into the enclosure. Stadium and Harsh Environments Note Some access points may not be certified for outdoor deployments in a NEMA enclosure. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 54 . such as a freezer or garden area. Check with your Cisco account team or the communications regulatory agency that has jurisdiction in your part of the world. some regulatory agencies permit AP outdoor NEMA enclosures if the AP is indoors.

CHAPTER 11 Areas with High Vibration If the access point is installed using a "side arm" type mount or other mounting locations where there is a likelihood of high vibration. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 55 . it is recommended that a padlock or metal pin be used to prevent the AP from vibrating loose from the bracket.

Areas with High Vibration Figure 56: Metallic Parts Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 56 .

com/c/dam/en/us/products/collateral/switches/catalyst-4500-series-switches/ at-a-glance-c45-733656.com/c/en/us/products/collateral/wireless/ aironet-3800-series-access-points/datasheet-c78-736498.cisco.html • AP-3800 Datasheet: http://www.com/enterprise/ introducing-cisco-catalyst-multigigabit-technology-to-future-proof-your-network-for-802-11ac-wave-2 ◦http://www. below are links to related information: • AP 2800 Datasheet: http://www.cisco.html • Understanding mGig: ◦http://blogs.com/c/en/us/products/wireless/aironet-2800-series-access-points/ index.html ◦http://www.html • Understanding Stadium.cisco.com/c/dam/en/us/solutions/collateral/enterprise-networks/ catalyst-multigigabit-switching/multigigabit-ethernet-technology.com/c/en/us/td/docs/wireless/controller/technotes/ 8-1/1850_DG/b_Cisco_Aironet_Series_1850_Access_Point_Deployment_Guide.cisco.pdf • mGig FAQ: http://www. CHAPTER 12 Related References In addition to the URLs already provided in this document. page 57 Previous Deployment Guides • Understanding LAG and MU-MIMO: http://www.com/c/en/us/solutions/enterprise-networks/catalyst-multigigabit-switching/ index.cisco. Factory and other RF theory such as Spatial Streams Data rates: http://www. Warehouse.com/c/en/us/td/docs/wireless/technology/apdeploy/8-0/Cisco_Aironet_3700AP.html • Previous Deployment Guides.cisco.pdf Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 57 .cisco.cisco.

Related References Previous Deployment Guides Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 58 .

antenna. • Flexible Radio Assignment ◦Allows for the additional XOR radio (if desired) to function similarly to a WSM module (off channel scanning) while primary 5–GHz radio services clients ◦Reduces installation costs as a single AP can now support two 5–GHz radios (fewer APs. This can provide flexibility in architectural designs and can reduce the number of needed Ethernet drops ◦Can increase accuracy of location based devices. corporate access on the other) • Flexible radio. and options using integrated antenna “I” series models ◦One radio can be set up for HDX Micro cell and second radio setup for a Macro cell ◦Both radios can be configured for HDX type coverage ( Micro / Micro ) cell Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 59 . so using FRA means fewer physical APs need to be deployed as the dual 5–GHz radios can replace installations that previously required two APs. better aesthetics). and client can roam from Micro to Macro cell on same AP ◦Primary 5GHz radio can service clients. while the secondary 5–GHz radio can be used to enable testing of wider 160 MHz and/or newer channels as they become available – allowing new features without limited performance ◦Allows for RF network separation (example: guest access on one radio. CHAPTER 13 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) 1 What are the differences between the AP 2800 and AP 3800? The AP 3800 has the following features that are not available on the AP 2800: • mGig • Option module support • RF filters and cellular coexistence and module RF isolation • Local DC power connector • Available as optional 3800P version for outdoor and stadium applications 2 What are the benefits of a Flexible Radio Architecture? Most sites have plenty of 2.4–GHz coverage.

allowing dual 5–GHz. AP‐3802P. and AP 3802P can be used to insert future modules. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) • Flexible Radio / Antenna Options using external antenna “e” series models ◦Both radios can be setup in HDX mode for Micro cells with external antenna models ◦Both radios can be set up in Macro cell mode with external antenna to provide two wide area cells ◦Different antennas can be used on each 5G radio for different coverage patterns (Omni and Directional). 6 What kind of plastic is AP 2800 and AP 3800 made of and is it suitable for use in hospital cleanroom environments? The plastic material used on the AP 2800 and AP 3800 series is Lexan 945.aspx 7 Looking at the specification sheets. Additionally. or one radio can serve one coverage cell while the other radio is used for a different classroom or outdoor coverage ◦Permits greater RF flexibility allowing XOR to combine with dedicated 5–GHz in DRE mode (default) OR SRE mode for a 5G/5G or separate 2. and future modes. future Smart Antennas will be released at future times. 4 What is the Extension module slot used for? The module slot on the AP 3802I. and AP‐2802E contain a SMART antenna connector. I noticed the Cisco AP 1850 supports 4x4:4 and the AP 2800/3800 supports 4x4:3. the flexible radio can be used in the full flexible radio Assignment mode. Once a Smart a ntenna is connected. wireless security monitoring. the flexible radio must stay in 2.sterislifesciences. Some of the proposed modules are: • 3G and LTE Small Cell Offload • Bluetooth Beaconing (BLE) • Future Wi-Fi upgrades to meet new IEEE standards • Video Surveillance • Custom Applications using Linux 5 Why is the Extension module slot on the side? The sidecar module architecture allows Network Engineers the ability to add/swap modules without dismounting the access point from the mounting bracket. Why does the AP 1850 support one more spatial stream? How does this help me? Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 60 . In addition. it frees the optional module from the constraints of being inside the AP. The Smart antenna connector can be used to connect to AIR‐CAB002‐DART‐R= which allow any RP‐TNC based Aironet antenna to connect to the Smart Antenna port.4 & 5G (dual band mode) 3 What is a SMART antenna connector? The Cisco Aironet AP‐3802E. Without a Smart antenna. which is connected directly to the flexible radio.4/5G or DRE 2.4GHz only mode.com/Products/Surface-Disinfectants-Cleaners-and-Alcohols/Sporicides-Sterilant/ Spor-Klenz-Ready-To-Use-Cold-Sterilant. This material was tested for clean room use with a Steris Chemical (trademark name SPOR-KLENZ ) http:// www. AP 3802E.

When operating in LAG. 8 How Does AUTO-Link Aggregation (LAG) work with the AP 2800 and AP 3800? Both the 2800 and 3800 support LAG across their primary ethernet interfaces and AUX ports. It makes sure each client type always operates at the best possible rate. FRA. CleanAir.11 access technology supported. This would provide 2Gbps of uplink to the access point.Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) When designing the AP 2800 and AP 3800 Cisco wanted to bring the very best technology into the device. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 61 . if any. The following Cisco switching series support LAG with the APs: • Catalyst 3850 / all models (non–Converged Access mode) • Catalyst 3650 / all models (non–Converged Access mode) • Catalyst 4500/Sup‐8E • Catalyst 6500/Sup 720 or newer 9 What is ClientLink 4. and the distance of the client from the Wi-Fi AP. The result improves performance in both directions. So while it may seem like MU-MIMO 4 spatial streams is an advantage. Many 802. and it does not require any special capabilities in the client device to work.11ac-capable AP suppliers also base their downlink enhancements on the optional transmit beamforming (TxBF) feature in 802. so that the AP can also better hear the client communications. that client is better able to "hear" the AP's transmission. one needs n+1 antennas (meaning you cannot beam-form a 4-ss client when the maximum number of antennas is 4. A trade-off was made to support dual 5–GHz 160 MHz rather than the extra spatial stream. from client to access point. network conditions. mGig can certainly use the AP 1850 and gain 4-SS. there are few. The benefit is only there when you have a single 4-SS client. MU-MIMO operation is for the most part limited to three 1-SS users or 1-SS and one 2-SS user. as determined by the 802. ClientLink also enhances performance in the uplink (client-to-AP) direction. 4-SS clients because the battery requirements of such a client are prohibited or limited to devices such as PCI card or other "plugged in devices". Cisco ClientLink technology is unique in offering both uplink and downlink performance improvements. Cisco has for years developed products using 3-SS as we use our 4th antenna to beam-form using ClientLink to maintain a robust 3-SS signal over a greater distance than what could be reasonably maintained without transmit beam-forming (TxBF).11ac-capable APs offer uplink-only enhancements. as the additional spatial stream provides little real benefit. MU-MIMO 4 Spatial streams seems like an advantage. Cost sensitive customers who don't require advanced features such as Cisco ClientLink. 160 MHz operation. many competing 802. so throughput is greater.0 is a beamforming capability built into Cisco Aironet® wireless LAN access points. which is a very small benefit. ClientLink helps to maintain maximum client rates. but it will not outperform the AP 2800 and AP 3800. ClientLink works with all client technologies.0? How is it different from IEEE 802. the 3800's multigigabit port will operate as a single GE port.11ac.11ac Wave-2 beam–forming? ClientLink 4. When the access point (AP) concentrates signals toward the receiving client. In order to maintain a good 4-SS link. Additionally. which requires TxCBF support in the client device to operate. By comparison.

1850. the 2. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) 10 I noticed that we can’t run 3800 with mGig and gigE ports in lag mode (without downgrading mGig). 13 Can you advise how much system memory this access point has? 1024 MB DRAM and 256MB flash 14 I would like to understand more about FRA and how RRM works ? Please refer the RRM guide at http://www. 12 Is PoE only accepted on the primary port? or can I also power the device using the secondary ethernet port? Only the primary Ethernet port negotiates Power over Ethernet. The 1830. Correct.3MR1 release. Cisco understands there are healthcare customers using legacy equipment with a need for TKIP support. 2800 and 3800 does not currently support TKIP but there are plans to support it in the 8.4 GHz Macro Cell is 4 dBi and the XOR radio (when in dual 5 GHz mode) uses a 6 dBi integrated antenna. if you have mGig there is no need to use LAG 11 The internal antennas on the AP 2800i and AP 3800i what is the gain in dBi? The 5 GHz Macro cell antenna is 5 dBi.cisco. Cisco Aironet Series 2800/3800 Access Point Deployment Guide 62 .com/c/en/us/td/docs/wireless/controller/technotes/8-2/ b_RRM_White_Paper.html 15 Does this product support TKIP? Customers should be discouraged from running legacy TKIP as that feature has been deprecated by the Wi-Fi Alliance.