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Scope and Sequence

CCNP 3: Multilayer Switching
Cisco Networking Academy Program Version 3.0

Table of Contents
CCNP 3: MULTILAYER SWITCHING....................................................................................................... 1 TARGET AUDIENCE ........................................................................................................................................ 3 PREREQUISITES .............................................................................................................................................. 3 COURSE DESCRIPTION.................................................................................................................................... 3 COURSE OBJECTIVES...................................................................................................................................... 3 LAB REQUIREMENTS ...................................................................................................................................... 4 CERTIFICATION ALIGNMENT .......................................................................................................................... 4 COURSE OVERVIEW ....................................................................................................................................... 4 COURSE OUTLINE ........................................................................................................................................... 6 Module 1. Campus Networks and Design Models .............................................................................. 6 Module 2. VLANs and VTP ................................................................................................................. 7 Module 3. Spanning-Tree Protocol..................................................................................................... 9 Module 4. Inter-VLAN Routing ......................................................................................................... 11 Module 5. Implementing Multilayer Switching in the Network ........................................................ 12 Module 6. Redundancy...................................................................................................................... 13 Module 7. Cisco AVVID .................................................................................................................... 14 Module 8. Quality of Service............................................................................................................. 15 Module 9. Security ............................................................................................................................ 17 Module 10. Transparent LAN Services ............................................................................................... 20 Case Study: Multilayer Switching ........................................................................................................... 21

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CCNP 3: Multilayer Switching v3.0

Copyright © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Target Audience
Those desiring to continue their post-CCNA preparation for a career as a network administrator, Level 2 support engineer, Level 2 systems engineer, network technician, or deployment engineer. CCNA certified individuals pursuing CCNP, CCIP, CCSP, CCDP, or CCIE certifications.

Prerequisites
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Students should have completed CCNA 1 – 4 or equivalent. CCNA Certification desired but not required. Work experience beneficial.

Course Description
CCNP 3: Multilayer Switching is the third of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) designation. CCNP 3 introduces students about the deployment of the state-of-the-art campus LANs. The course focuses on the selection and implementation of the appropriate Cisco IOS services to build reliable scalable multilayer-switched LANs. Students will develop skills with VLANs, VTP, STP, inter-VLAN routing, multilayer switching, redundancy, Cisco AVVID solutions, QoS issues, campus LAN security, and emerging transparent LAN services. This hands-on, lab-oriented course stresses the design, implementation, operation, and troubleshooting of switched and routed environments.

Course Objectives
The CCNP certification indicates knowledge of networking for the small-office, home-office (SOHO) market and enterprise markets and the ability to work in businesses or organizations whose networks have between 100 and 500 nodes. A CCNP certified individual should be able to:
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Implement appropriate technologies to build a scalable routed network Build campus networks using multiplayer switching technologies Improve traffic flow, reliability, redundancy, and performance for campus LANs, routed and switched WANs, and remote access networks Create and deploy a global intranet Troubleshoot an environment that uses Cisco routers and switches for multiprotocol client hosts and services Perform entry-level tasks in the planning, design, installation, operation and troubleshooting of Ethernet, TCP/IP networks.
Copyright © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

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CCNP 3: Multilayer Switching v3.0

CCNP 3 is an integral step towards achieving CCNP Certification. Upon completion of this course, students will have performed tasks related to:
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Campus Networks and Design Models VLANs and VTP STP InterVLAN Routing Multilayer Switching Redundancy AVVID QoS Security Transparent LAN Services

Lab Requirements
Please refer to CCNP Equipment Bundle Spreadsheets on Cisco Academy Connection (CAC)

Certification Alignment
The curriculum is aligned with ILSGs BCMSN course and the 642-811 exam.

Course Overview
The course is designed to be delivered in a 70 contact hour time frame. Approximately 45 hours will be designated to lab activities and 25 hours on curriculum content. A case study on multiplayer switching is required, but format and timing are determined by the Local Academy.

What has changed from CCNP versions 2.x? I “Set-based” Cat OS commands removed
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Assumption of IOS CLI switch configuration background from CCNA Removal of LAN Media and Multicasting chapters Revision of VLAN, STP, MLS, HSRP, and Security topics Addition of AVVID, QoS, and Transparent LAN services modules More interactive Flash activities
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CCNP 3: Multilayer Switching v3.0

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More than 40 eLabs are included in the curriculum Focus is maintained on hands-on labs

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Copyright © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Course Outline
Module 1. Campus Networks and Design Models
Overview 1.1 Overview of a Campus Network 1.1.1 1.1.2 1.1.3 1.1.4 1.1.5 1.1.6 Traditional campus networks Issues with traditional campus network designs Traditional 80/20 rule of network traffic The new 20/80 rule of network traffic Key requirements of the evolving campus structure Evolving campus structure

1.2 Key Characteristics of Various Switching Technologies 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.2.4 1.2.5 1.2.6 1.2.7 1.2.8 Overview Layer 2 switching Layer 3 switching Layer 4 switching Mulilayer switching Quality of Service (QoS) Multicast Hierarchical design model for campus networks

1.3 Building-Block Approach 1.3.1 1.3.2 1.3.3 1.3.4 1.3.5 1.3.6 1.3.7 1.3.8 The switch block Scaling the switch block Building the core block Layer 2 and 3 backbone scaling Advantages of the building-block approach Small campus networks Medium campus networks Large campus networks

1.4 Basic Configuration of the Switch 1.4.1 1.4.2 1.4.3 1.4.4 1.4.5
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Cabling the switch block Connecting to the console port Connecting an Ethernet port Clearing a configuration Setting a password
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1.4.6 1.4.7 1.4.8 1.4.9

Naming the switch Configure the switch for remote access Identifying individual ports Defining link speed and line mode on a switch

1.5 Important IOS Features 1.5.1 1.5.2 1.5.3 1.5.4 1.5.5 1.5.6 1.5.7 Command-line recall Using the help feature Password recovery Setting an IDLE timeout Verifying connectivity Backup and restoration of a configuration using a TFTP server HTTP Access to the switch

1.6 Hands-on Lab Exercises 1.6.1 1.6.2 1.6.3 1.6.4 1.6.5 Summary Catalyst 2950 and 3550 series basic setup Catalyst 2950 and 3500 configuration and IOS files Catalyst 2950 and 3550 series password recovery Fluke network inspector Fluke protocol inspector

Module 2. VLANs and VTP
Overview 2.1 VLAN Basics 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1.4 2.1.5 2.1.6 2.1.7 Describe a VLAN Motivation for VLANs VLANs and network security VLANs and broadcast distribution VLANs and bandwidth utilization VLANs versus router latency Wrong motives for implementing VLANs

2.2 VLAN Security 2.2.1 2.2.2 2.2.3
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Overview Understanding switch ACLs Router ACLs
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2.2.4 2.2.5 2.2.6 2.2.7

Configuring router ACLs Configuring VLAN maps Using VLAN maps with router ACLs Applying router ACLs and VLAN maps on VLANs

2.3 VLAN Types 2.3.1 2.3.2 2.3.3 2.3.4 2.3.5 2.3.6 VLAN boundaries End-to-end VLANs Local VLANs Establishing VLAN memberships Port-based VLAN membership Dynamic VLANs

2.4 Configuring VLANs and VMPS 2.4.1 2.4.2 2.4.3 2.4.4 2.4.5 2.4.6 Configuring static VLANs Verifying VLAN configuration Deleting VLANs VMPS operation VMPS configuration guidelines Access links and trunk links

2.5 VLAN Identification 2.5.1 2.5.2 2.5.3 2.5.4 2.5.5 VLAN frame identification Inter-Switch Link The IEEE 802.1Q protocol The IEEE 802.10 protocol LAN emulation

2.6 VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) 2.6.1 2.6.2 2.6.3 2.6.4 2.6.5 2.6.6 2.6.7 2.6.8 Trunking overview Configuring a VLAN trunk Removing VLANS from a trunk VTP benefits VTP operation VTP modes Adding a switch to a VTP domain VTP advertisement

2.7 VTP Configuration and VTP Pruning 2.7.1 2.7.2
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Basic configuration steps Configuring the VTP version
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2.7.3 2.7.4 2.7.5 2.7.6 2.7.7 2.7.8

Configuring the VTP domain Configuring the VTP mode Verifying VTP configuration Default behavior of a switch Configure VTP pruning Verifying VTP pruning

2.8 Hands-on Lab Exercises 2.8.1 2.8.2 2.8.3 2.8.4 Summary Catalyst 2950 and 3550 series static VLANs Catalyst 2950 and 3550 series VTP domain and VLAN trunking Catalyst 2950 and 3550 series VTP pruning Catalyst 2950 and 3550 series intra-VLAN security

Module 3.

Spanning-Tree Protocol

Overview 3.1 Spanning Tree Protocol Operation 3.1.1 3.1.2 3.1.3 3.1.4 3.1.5 3.1.6 STP concepts Broadcast loops Bridge-table corruption Spanning-Tree Algorithm Path cost Port ID

3.2 STP Processes 3.2.1 3.2.2 3.2.3 3.2.4 3.2.5 3.2.6 3.2.7 3.2.8 3.2.9 STP decisions and BPDU exchanges Three steps of STP convergence Electing the root bridge Electing root ports Electing designated ports STP state STP timers BPDU format Topology changes and STP

3.3 STP Enhancements 3.3.1
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Delay in STP updates
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3.3.2 3.3.3 3.3.4 3.3.5

PortFast UplinkFast BackboneFast Modifying port cost for EtherChannel groups

3.4 802.1w Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol 3.4.1 3.4.2 3.4.3 3.4.4 3.4.5 Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol RSTP states RSTP port roles RSTP timers RSTP BPDU format

3.5 Evolution of Spanning Tree 3.5.1 3.5.2 3.5.3 3.5.4 3.5.5 3.5.6 PVST + MST (802.1 s) Enhanced PVST + Load balancing Switchport tuning using BPDU guard Switchport tuning using root guard

3.6 STP Configuration 3.6.1 3.6.2 3.6.3 3.6.4 3.6.5 3.6.6 3.6.7 Default STP configuration Enabling and disabling Spanning-Tree Protocol Modifying the root bridge Setting the priority for ports and VLANs Setting the port cost Configuring switch priority of a VLAN Modifying default timers

3.7 RSTP and MST Configuration 3.7.1 3.7.2 3.7.3 3.7.4 3.7.5 3.7.6 3.7.7 3.7.8 3.7.9 Default RSTP and MSTP configuration RSTP and MSTP configuration guidelines Enabling RSTP and MSTP Configuring the MST root switch Configuring MST port priority Configuring MST path cost Configuring MST switch priority Configuring MSTP timers Configuring maximum hop count

3.8 Tuning, Verifying, and Troubleshooting Spanning-Tree Protocol
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3.8.1 3.8.2 3.8.3 3.8.4 3.8.5 3.8.6 3.8.7

Configuring PortFast Configuring UplinkFast Configuring BackboneFast Configuring BPDU guard Configuring root guard Configuring load balancing Verifying STP, RSTP, and MTSP configuration

3.9 EtherChannel 3.9.1 3.9.2 3.9.3 3.9.4 3.9.5 3.9.6 3.9.7 EtherChannel explained EtherChannel methods Frame distribution Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP) Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) EtherChannel configuration guidelines Configuring EtherChannel

3.10 Hands-on Lab Exercises 3.10.1 3.10.2 3.10.3 3.10.4 Summary STP default behavior Spanning-root port priorities Spanning-root VLAN load balancing Configuring fast EtherChannel

Module 4. Inter-VLAN Routing
Overview 4.1 Methods of Inter-VLAN Routing 4.1.1 4.1.2 4.1.3 4.1.4 4.1.5 4.1.6 4.1.7 Key components of Inter-VLAN routing Comparison of Layer 2 and Layer 3 operations in the core Inter-VLAN routing performance and scalability issues Role of the native VLAN Route switch processors Router on a stick Cisco Layer 3 feature cards

4.2 Configuring Inter-VLAN Routing 4.2.1 Configuring inter-VLAN routing in a switched network

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4.2.2 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.2.6 4.2.7

Configuring inter-VLAN routing via the switch virtual interface Configuring inter-VLAN routing via the routed port Configuring routing between an external router and an internal route processor Configuring router-on-a-stick Verifying the inter-VLAN routing configuration Troubleshooting inter-VLAN routing

4.3 Hands-on Lab Exercises 4.3.1 4.3.2 4.3.3 Summary Configure an external router to route inter-VLAN traffic Configure inter-VLAN with an internal route processor Configure routing between an external router and an internal route processor

Module 5. Implementing Multilayer Switching in the Network
Overview 5.1 Multilayer Switching 5.1.1 5.1.2 5.1.3 5.1.4 5.1.5 Introduction to MLS MLS hardware and software requirements MLS components MLS flows MLS operation

5.2 Cisco Express Forwarding 5.2.1 5.2.2 5.2.3 5.2.4 5.2.5 5.2.6 5.2.7 Cisco Express Forwarding overview Comparing MLS and CEF CEF operation CEF forwarding information base CEF adjacency table Packet flow for Layer 2 and Layer 3 forwarding decisions Additional benefits of CEF-based forwarding

5.3 MLS and CEF Configuration Tasks 5.3.1 5.3.2 5.3.3 MLS-RP configuration MLS-SE configuration Configuring MLS optional parameters

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CCNP 3: Multilayer Switching v3.0

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5.3.4 5.3.5 5.3.6

MLS configuration example MLS verification CEF configuration and verification

5.4 Hands-on Lab Exercise 5.4.1 Summary Lab 5.4.1

Module 6.

Redundancy

Overview 6.1 Implementing Module Redundancy in a Multilayer Switched Module 6.1.1 6.1.2 6.1.3 6.1.4 6.1.5 Introducing redundancy Implementing redundant supervisor engines in Catalyst switches Implementing redundant supervisor uplink modules in Catalyst switches Implementing redundant distributed forwarding cards in Catalyst switches Implementing redundant power supplies

6.2 Implementing Router Redundancy in a Switched Network 6.2.1 6.2.2 6.2.3 6.2.4 6.2.5 6.2.6 6.2.7 Router redundancy operation ICMP Router Discovery Protocol (IRDP) Hot Standby Router Protocol Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) Gateway Load Balancing Protocol (GLBP) Single Router Mode (SRM) redundancy Server Load Balancing (SLB)

6.3 HSRP Operations 6.3.1 6.3.2 6.3.3 6.3.4 HSRP operations The virtual router MAC address HSRP messages HSRP states

6.4 HSRP Configuration 6.4.1 6.4.2 6.4.3
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Configuring HSRP How HSRP addresses these issues HSRP standby priority
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6.4.4 6.4.5 6.4.6 6.4.7 6.4.8 6.4.9

HSRP standby preempt HSRP hello timers HSRP interface tracking Verify HSRP configuration HSRP over trunk links Troubleshooting HSRP

6.5 Hands-on Lab Exercises 6.5.1 6.5.2 Summary Lab 6.5.1 Lab 6.5.2

Module 7. Cisco AVVID
Overview 7.1 Introduction to Cisco AVVID 7.1.1 7.1.2 7.1.3 7.1.4 7.1.5 Examining the Cisco AVVID framework Cisco AVVID network infrastructure Cisco AVVID intelligent network services Cisco AVVID network solutions Cisco AVVID network implementations example

7.2 Examining IP Mullticast in a Multilayer Switched Network 7.2.1 7.2.2 7.2.3 7.2.4 7.2.5 7.2.6 7.2.7 7.2.8 7.2.9 7.2.10 7.2.11 7.2.12 7.2.13 7.2.14
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Multicast overview Multicast addressing IGMP operation IGMP version 1 IGMP version 2 IGMP version 1 and 2 interoperability IGMP version 3 IGMP snooping Configuring IGMP snooping on a Catalyst IOS-based switch CGMP operation Routing multicast traffic Multicast routing protocols Configuring IP multicast routing Optional IP multicast routing tasks
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7.3 Cisco IP Telephony 7.3.1 7.3.2 7.3.3 7.3.4 7.3.5 7.3.6 7.3.7 7.3.8 7.3.9 7.3.10 7.3.11 7.3.12 Summary Introducing the Cisco IP Telephony Solution Cisco IP Telephony designs Single-site model Multiple sites with independent call processing Multiple site with distributed call processing Multsite IP WAN with centralized call processing Voice quality issues Implementing QoS for voice Traffic classification Network design issues for voice IP addressing and management Implementing IP Telephony with auxiliary VLANs

Module 8. Quality of Service
Overview 8.1 Quality of Service Requirements 8.1.1 8.1.2 8.1.3 8.1.4 8.1.5 8.1.6 8.1.7 8.1.8 8.1.9 Quality of Service defined Loss Delay or latency Delay variation or jitter Network availability Provisioning Quality of Service requirements for data Quality of Service requirements for voice Quality of Service requirements for video

8.2 Quality of Service mechanisms 8.2.1 8.2.2 8.2.3 8.2.4 8.2.5 8.2.6 8.2.7
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Best-effort service Integrated services model Differentiated services model Traffic marking Modular QoS command-line interface (CLI) Classification of traffic – the class-map Defining the QoS policy – the policy-map
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8.2.8

Applying the policy to an interface – the service-policy

8.3 Classification at the Access Layer 8.3.1 8.3.2 8.3.3 8.3.4 8.3.5 8.3.6 8.3.7 Trusting the CoS Configuring CoS trust using the IOS Assigning CoS on a per-port basis. Re-writing the CoS Using a MAC ACL to assign a DSCP value Configuring DSCP using a MAC ACL Using an IP ACL to define the DSCP or precedence

8.4 Policing and Marking 8.4.1 8.4.2 8.4.3 8.4.4 8.4.5 8.4.6 8.4.7 Individual policers Aggregate policers Token bucket Classification and policing using Committed Access Rate (CAR) Configuring the policed DSCP map Configuring Classification using CAR Configuring policing using CAR

8.5 Scheduling 8.5.1 8.5.2 8.5.3 8.5.4 8.5.5 8.5.6 FIFO queue Weighted Fair Queuing (WFQ) WFQ and IP precedence Class Based Weighted Fair Queuing (CBWFQ) Configuring CBWFQ CBWFQ bandwidth allocation

8.6 Congestion Avoidance 8.6.1 8.6.2 8.6.3 8.6.4 8.6.5 8.6.6 Weighted random early detection (WRED) Configuring WRED on a physical interface Verifying WRED configuration Configuring WRED with CBWFQ Low Latency Queuing (LLQ) Configuring LLQ

8.7 Traffic Shaping 8.7.1 8.7.2 8.7.3
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Traffic shaping overview Generic traffic shaping (GTS) Configuring GTS for an interface
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8.7.4 8.7.5 8.7.6

GTS for Frame Relay networks Configuring GTS for Frame Relay networks Verifying GTS configuration

8.8 QoS using Low Speed Links 8.8.1 8.8.2 8.8.3 8.8.4 8.8.5 Link efficiency mechanisms Link fragmentation and interleaving Link fragmentation and interleaving (LFI): Multilink PPP Compressed Real-Time Protocol (cRTP) Configuring cRTP

8.9 Hands-on Lab Exercises 8.9.1 8.9.2 8.9.3 8.9.4 8.9.5 8.9.6 8.9.7 8.9.8 8.9.9 8.9.10 8.9.11 8.9.12 Summary Classifying traffic using CoS at the access layer Introduction to the modular QoS command-line interface QoS classification and policing using CAR Weighted Fair Queuing Configuring WRED on an interface. Configuring WRED with CBWFQ Configuring LLQ Configuring GTS QoS manually configured FRTS QoS dynamically configured FRTS Link fragmentation and interleaving QoS cRTP

Module 9. Security
Overview 9.1 Monitoring Switched Network Performance with SPAN and VSPAN 9.1.1 9.1.2 9.1.3 9.1.4 9.1.5 9.1.6 Monitoring switched network performance with SPAN and VSPAN Monitoring with SPAN on a port basis SPAN Interaction with other features SPAN and VSPAN configuration limitations Configuring SPAN sessions VSPAN – SPAN using VLANS as monitored source

9.2 RSPAN
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9.2.1 9.2.2 9.2.3 9.2.4 9.2.5 9.2.6

RSPAN overview RSPAN reflector ports RSPAN interaction with other features RSPAN and RSPAN VLANs Configuring RSPAN Configuring RSPAN to filter trunks for specific VLAN traffic

9.3 Network Analysis Modules and Switch Fabric Modules 9.3.1 9.3.2 9.3.3 9.3.4 9.3.5 9.3.6 9.3.7 9.3.8 Overview of network analysis and switch fabric modules The network analysis module Using the NAM Benefits of deploying a NAM NAM troubleshooting Increasing switching fabric in 6500 series switches Configuring the Switch Fabric Module Monitoring the Switch Fabric Module

9.4 Basic Security 9.4.1 9.4.2 9.4.3 9.4.4 9.4.5 9.4.6 9.4.7 Access control policy Basic security measures Physical security Connecting to the switch Out-of-band management In-band management Basic password protection

9.5 Securing Remote Management 9.5.1 9.5.2 9.5.3 9.5.4 9.5.5 9.5.6 9.5.7 9.5.8 9.5.9 Remote management security options Advanced user name options Encrypting communications using Secure Shell Encryption key-pairs Using VLANs to restrict remote management Securing the web management interface Using access lists to restrict remote management Additional remote management session options Configuring, verifying and, troubleshooting SSH server

9.6 Securing User Access 9.6.1
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Securing user access
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9.6.2 9.6.3 9.6.4 9.6.5 9.6.6 9.6.7 9.6.8 9.6.9

Using port security, protected ports, and private VLANs Using access lists Router ACLs Port ACLs VLAN ACLs and VLAN maps Configuring and verifying port security Configuring and verifying protected ports Configuring and verifying access lists

9.7 Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting 9.7.1 9.7.2 9.7.3 9.7.4 9.7.5 9.7.6 9.7.7 9.7.8 9.7.9 Introduction to AAA and security protocols TACACS+ RADIUS Cisco Secure Access Control Server (ACS) Configuring AAA Configuring TACACS+ and RADIUS clients Configuring AAA authentication Configuring AAA authorization Configuring AAA accounting

9.8 802.1X Port-based Authentication 9.8.1 9.8.2 9.8.3 9.8.4 9.8.5 9.8.6 Understanding 802.1X Authentication initiation and message exchange Ports in authorized and unauthorized states Supported topologies 802.1x configuration guidelines Configuring 802.1x port-based authentication

9.9 Hands-on Lab Exercises 9.9.1 9.9.2 9.9.3 9.9.4 9.9.5 9.9.6 9.9.7 9.9.8 9.9.9 9.9.10
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SPAN configuration VSPAN configuration RSPAN configuration Network analysis module Switch fabric module Setting encrypted passwords Using local usernames and passwords Advanced username options SSH Server encryption Management VLANs on a single switch
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9.9.11 9.9.12 9.9.13 9.9.14 9.9.15 9.9.16 9.9.17 9.9.18 9.9.19 9.9.20 9.9.21 9.9.22 Summary

Management VLANs in a multilayer switched network Restricting virtual terminal sessions with access lists Restricting web interface sessions with access lists Restricting user-specific sessions with access lists AAA with TACACS+ and AAA server for authentication AAA with TACACS+ and AAA server for authorization Port security Protected ports Router ACLs Port ACLs VLAN ACLs Configuring 802.1x port based authentication

Module 10. Transparent LAN Services
Overview 10.1 Ethernet Solutions for Transparent LAN Services 10.1.1 10.1.2 10.1.3 10.1.4 10.1.5 Same Network, New Services VLAN tunneling Inter-metro LAN transport Inter-service POP connectivity Metro segmentation

10.2 Introducing Transparent LAN Service Architecture 10.2.1 10.2.2 10.2.3 10.2.4 10.2.5 Metro Ethernet services IP+Optical Point-to-point dedicated Point-to-multipoint shared Role of QoS in TLS

10.3 Examining Fiber Optic Transports 10.3.1 10.3.2 10.3.3 10.3.4 10.3.5 Defining SONET and SDH Applications for SONET/SDH Implementing SONET/SDH within a metropolitan network Defining Dynamic Packet Transport Defining DWDM and CWDM

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10.3.6 10.3.7

Implementing DWDM over a MAN 10-Gigabit Ethernet standards

10.4 Hands-on Lab Exercise 10.4.1 10.4.2 10.4.3 10.4.4 Summary Configuring transparent LAN services Configuring dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM) Configuring packet over SONET Configuring dynamic packet transport

Case Study: Multilayer Switching

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Copyright © 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.