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Twitter 2.0: SOCIAL NETWORK CUTS OFF THIRD-PARTY OFF APPS

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FLYING SOLO

It’s hard to imagine the internet without Twitter. Whether we’re following a breaking news story, tweeting along to our favorite television shows or watching celebrities argue over music, the social network is a major part of our everyday lives. Whilst Facebook and Instagram are for our friends and family, Twitter is our window to the world - to engage in debates, understand new perspectives and have real-time conversations with people from all walks of life.

Twitter was one of the first social networks to make its way to the iPhone with the release of iOS 2, but it was a third-party developer that created the app rather than the company itself. Indeed, Twitter has a history of being open source, and relying on developers to create software for its users, before swallowing up those software companies ( , and a social media analytics company). Indeed, Twitter acquired .

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